Ways of Selecting and Using Binoculars in Winter

Are you ready for the next winter season? Many of you replied yes, you are! What about your binoculars? Sounds weird, right? But it’s very very crucial to choose binoculars for the winter season also.

Winter is my personal favorite. And I always choose and use specific binoculars to deal with super cold weather. And, also do some extra care of all of my other bino pairs. Do you want to know the ways of selecting and using binoculars in winter? Keep reading to get a complete guide to choosing and using binoculars even in winter. Let’s begin-

Why do you need special binoculars in the winter season?

In the winter season, the temperature range of the USA is between -3 °C to 4 °C. So the air is generally colder and drier. This can cause several problems for your binoculars, including condensation and fog. However, some special binoculars that are designed for use in the winter season can help to prevent these problems and allow you to get the most out of your binoculars.

First of all, when it snows, the air is filled with tiny ice crystals which can reflect light in all directions. This means that the amount of light that reaches your eyes is reduced, making it harder to see. They also have a higher light transmission than regular binoculars, which means you can see better in the low light of winter.

Again, winter binoculars are made with a material that does not freeze in the cold. At the same time, these binoculars typically have a higher rating for water and fog resistance. This is important because the cold weather can create condensation on regular binoculars, which can make it difficult to see through them.

However, when the sun reflects off of the snow, it can cause a lot of glare which can make it hard to see. Additionally, these binoculars can help to reduce glare from the sun.

What are the best binoculars for winter?

Image Features
Hooway 7×50: (best waterproof binoculars for winter)

Hooway 7x50: (best waterproof binoculars for winter)

  • Magnification – 7x
  • Objective lens – 50mm
  • Eye relief – 22mm
  • Exit pupil – 7.1mm
  • Field of view – 396 feet at 1000 yards
  • Material – Rubber
  • Prims – Bak-4
  • Lens – FMC
  • Water resistance – Yes
  • Tripod Mount – Yes
  • Extra – Compass & rangefinder
  • Accessories included – Included
  • Weight – 2.2 pounds

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Esslnb 7X50: (best IPX7 binoculars for winter)

Esslnb 7X50: (best IPX7 binoculars for winter)

  • Magnification – 7x
  • Objective lens – 50mm
  • Eye relief – 23mm
  • Exit pupil – 7.1mm
  • Field of view – 396 feet at 1000 yards
  • Material – Rubber
  • Prims – Bak-4
  • Lens – FMC
  • Water resistance – IPX7, nitrogen filled and O-ring sealed
  • Extra – Compass & rangefinder
  • Accessories included – Included
  • Weight – 3.09 pounds

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Nocoex 10×50: (best-hunting binoculars for winter)

Nocoex 10x50: (best-hunting binoculars for winter)

  • Magnification – 10x
  • Objective lens – 50mm
  • Eye relief – 23mm
  • Exit pupil -5.0mm
  • Field of view – 396 feet at 1000 yards (±5 diopter)
  • Material – Rubber
  • Prims – Porro
  • Lens – FMC
  • Water resistance – Nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed
  • Extra – Compass, rangefinder, anti-shake
  • Accessories included – Included
  • Weight –  2.2 lbs

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Sedpell 12×50: (best HD binoculars for winter)

  • Magnification – 12x
  • Objective lens – 50mm
  • Eye relief- 22mm
  • Exit pupil -4.16mm
  • Field of view – 400 feet at 1000 yards
  • Material – Rubber
  • Prims – Porro
  • Lens – FMC
  • Water resistance – IPX7, Argon filled and O-ring sealed
  • Extra – Smartphone adapter
  • Accessories included – Included
  • Weight –  2.14 pounds

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Uscamel 10×50: (best birding binoculars for winter)

  • Magnification – 10x
  • Objective lens – 50mm
  • Exit pupil -5.0mm
  • Field of view – 396 feet at 1000 yards (±5 diopter)
  • Material – Rubber
  • Prims – Bak-4 Porro
  • Lens – FMC
  • Water resistance – Nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed
  • Extra – Compass, rangefinder, tripod adapter
  • Accessories included – Included
  • Weight –  3.57 lbs

Check on Amazon

Ways of selecting binoculars for winter

There are a lot of reasons to take up this hobby in the winter season. One reason is that many birds migrate during this time, so you have the chance to see new species. Additionally, winter is a great time to see birds because there are fewer leaves on the trees, making it easier to spot them.

When the winter season comes, people often think that they don’t need special binoculars because the snow is white and bright. But you must have some concerns while choosing a binocular for use, especially in winter.

1. Waterproof and Fog proof

First, you have to make sure the binoculars you select are IPX6 or IPX7 waterproof. At the same time, they have argon purged or nitrogen purged to prevent internal fogging. Also, O-ring sealing will help you to keep the bino pair out of moisture, fog, and snow.

Also, make sure the whole body is covered with rubber armor as well as has a grippy coating. As a result, you can hold it for a long time with a non-slip experience.

See also – Are fog-proof and waterproof binoculars worth the money?

2. Right Eyecups

Second, you should pay attention to the eye cups. In colder temperatures, you may be wearing gloves, and you will want eye cups that can be adjusted even while wearing gloves. Some models have twist-up eyecups, while others have sliding eyecups. Either type will work as long as you can operate them easily with gloves on. However, I prefer twisted up-down eyecups in winter. Because of wearing hand gloves, it will be a hassle to operate the sliding eyecups.

Also, make sure the eye cups are good enough to resist fog, water, and moisture to keep the lenses dry and safe.

3. Focus Knob

Consider the winter binoculars with a smooth center focus knob. As you can easily change and adjust your focus on the targeted objects. Also, operating the focus knob while taking off your hand gloves is not preferable in heavy cold weather. So try to choose a binocular which has a little bit of a large focus knob.

4. Magnification and Objective Lens

Because of the fog and snow, you can’t observe too many long-distance objects like summer or spring. So you should pick 8x-12x magnification to enjoy birding, hiking, hunting, and enjoying sports. These level magnifications provide a wide field of view too.

Also, you should pay attention to the objective lens diameter. As the winter days are mostly gloomy as well as lights are less than in other seasons, low-light binoculars will be the best options.

However, you can choose a 50mm, or 60mm size objective lens to get a maximum light transmission that can produce bright and clear images. Also, choosing a fully multi-coated lens as well as Bak-4 prism binoculars will deliver images with higher resolution and clarity.

Note – For heavy snow or fog, measuring the actual distance seems difficult in winter. So, choosing a pair with a rangefinder and compass will make your hunting, hiking or birding journey smoother and easier.

 4. Eye Relief and Exit Pupil

As lights are less in this season mostly, you should choose binoculars with long eye relief and exit pupil distances. To get rid of the cold as well as keep your eyes and lashes from freezing, we used eyeglasses. So a long eye relief (more than 15mm), as well as a long exit pupil (between 4-5mm), is necessary to get a comfortable viewing experience.

5. Size and Weight

Usually, a pair of heavy binoculars that are uncomfortable hold up to your eyes for long periods. On the other hand, too compact binoculars are not recommended for winter also. As you have hand gloves, they may cover up the lenses slightly when you hold the bino pair. Also, the hat, as well as eyewear, will not be compatible with compact binoculars.

Rather you can go for full-size binoculars with a tripod or smartphone mount system. As a result, you can experience a hands-free viewing session. Make sure the weight is not too high. Try to pick a bino pair around 1lb, so you can carry it even in your pocket of the winter jacket. Additionally, an open bridge design will help to hold and adjust the focus comfortably.

How to use binoculars in winter?

How to use binoculars in winter? Well, the operating system and functionalities are the same like other seasons. You just need to select the right one and get ready to explore the world. To make the viewing session smooth and relaxed, here presenting some guides that you will need to prepare yourself to deal with winter. Have a look-

1. Use hand warmers

If your hands are cold, it will be difficult to hold the binoculars steady. In that case, using hand warmers can help keep your hands warm and prevent them from getting too cold.

2. Layer up

Wearing layers will help you stay warm while using binoculars. Make sure to wear gloves or mittens so your fingers don’t freeze!

3. Use a tripod

A tripod can be a big help in keeping the binoculars steady, especially in windy conditions.

4. Turn the binoculars up toward the sun

The warmth from the sun will help keep your hands warm and prevent them from freezing.

5. Always carry essential accessories

Always carry a padded zipper carrying bad for your binoculars. Make sure that the bag is capable of withstanding water, fog, and moisture.

Also, keep the lens cloth with you. So when the lens gets foggy, you can clean them immediately. Additionally, you can carry an optical solution in case you need to clean the lens.

Moreover, use the neck strap when using the binoculars in the snow. That will keep the pair secure and safe.

Plus, when you are binoculars in extremely cold weather, consider storing them in an interior pocket close to your body to keep them from getting too cold.

How to store binoculars in winter?

You already have ideas on how you can choose and use binoculars in winter. But not all day long you used the binoculars. Back home, you have to clean them first and then store them properly in a warm place. Not only winter binoculars, but any binoculars also need extra care and a special storing system in the winter. Otherwise, they might damage so easily no matter how expensive they are.

Here are a few tips on how to store binoculars in winter:

1. Keep them in a warm, dry place

If possible, store your binoculars indoors during the winter months. If you must keep them outside, make sure they are stored in a waterproof container or case.

2. Avoid extreme temperature changes

Don’t leave your binoculars in a car overnight where they will be subject to drastic temperature changes. This can damage the optics and cause condensation to form inside the lenses.

3. Use a desiccant pack

Consider using a desiccant pack to absorb moisture and prevent condensation inside the lenses. In case water or fog insert into the lens or you can see moisture particles inside the lens, you can follow these steps – How to get water out of binoculars? (3 solutions)

4. Use a zipper bag

When not in use, keep your binoculars stored in their carrying case. This will help keep them clean and protected from scratches.

Final words

It is crucial to select binoculars that will work well in winter conditions. You also need to be aware of the different ways to use them to get the most out of your experience. Hopefully, the ways of selecting and using binoculars in winter will be useful for you. Also, the 5 suggestions for winter binoculars will make the struggle of choosing the right one effortless.

So why are you waiting? Grab the best one and be ready for wintertime hiking, hiking, sightseeing, and many more!

About Nathan Mattingly

Nathan Mattingly, our head of writer section. He has completed his graduation in Computer Science from the University of California. He loves to collect vintage binoculars from his childhood. And his hobby is bird watching with binoculars. As a computer science student, he works in many technical fields and did several experiments on them. Before writing a review, he always buys the binoculars, uses them for several purposes then writes reviews for their features and functionalities. So, there is no chance of deceiving!

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